Little Warrior's Adventures

Wilderness, hunting, and animal stuff.
There will be a lot of dogs.
There will also be a lot of bones, dead animals, taxidermy, and possibly some gore.
I love animals. I love nature. I love hunting, fishing and being outdoors.

rowkey:

Aaaand here’s all ten Ohio Biomes spreads, sunrise to sunset!  I’m not sure I can put into words how much I learned from this experience- from crash courses in texture rendering to communicating with printers -but I’m delighted to have been a part of it. And thank you all for the touching feedback over the past two weeks- it’s been a joy. :)

I’ll post some updates to this blog when the free educator’s/standalone edition of this magazine is printed and distributed- I need to work out a few kinks regarding regional orders and the like.  Again, thank you for the kind words, all!

I can’t stop looking at these beautiful illustrations.  These are just fantastic.

(via zooophagous)

Playing Find The Dead Thing with my dogs is a little irritating.  I know they know where the dead thing is, because they put on Dead Thing Cologne™, but they just won’t show me where it is!

Wow, I really wish these weren’t such fantastically horrible pictures.   I looked out the window and saw a bunch of turkey and black vultures hanging around, so I went outside to try to get some pictures.  But it’s so damn humid that it fogged up my lens, so this is what I got. 

All the vultures flew off, circling the sky, and left this one on the ground.  I was still yards away, but he saw me coming so he tried to turn to move, but he fell over, hobbled up, fell over again before flapping a few times to disappear behind the trees.  He only had one leg.

I think I’ll toss some old meat out for them… they might like that.

Anonymous asked: regarding the photo of the "older beauty." yes she is striking. remember though, she also totally fits into the mold of a long standing definition of what's attractive: slim, toned and youthful appearing. namaste.

forestferncreations:

I thought the same thing when I saw that. I think that’s why Tasha Tudor is my favorite example of aged female beauty. She’s not pretty, refined or youthful in the slightest but she’s still the most beautiful woman and soul I could ever think of.

I didn’t know about Tasha Tudor until about a year ago, when my English teacher told me to look at her works.  She lived the kind of life I want to live.  She was a commercial illustrator, whose goal was to make enough money writing and illustrating children’s books to purchase bulbs for her garden.  She had something like 13 corgis at a time, and lived in a wonderful little cottage surrounded by a beautiful garden.  Sometimes when I get discouraged about my own art work, I think about her life and I have something wonderful to look forward to.

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

http://thegreenwolf.tumblr.com/post/95022664582/oddmodout-is-there-a-reason-that-people-dont

oddmodout:

Is there a reason that people don’t seem to understand that designing images for my buttons is actually work that I need to get paid for? I mean, OK, if I’m just slapping on some text for a friend, I might waive the design fee if I already have the desired font, or if so-and-so…

This is a huge problem that really bothers me.  When I see a freelance job that wants, say, 10 illustrations and offers $100, I don’t even apply because that’s ridiculous.  I might complain to my boyfriend about it, who says that I should do it, but do, basically, crap quality work for crap quality pay.  I don’t think this helps the situation at all, and I refuse to do it at all for the pay being that low.  Not to mention that then I would be known as the illustrator that does crap work, and I am not okay with that.

And as far as doing work that is “good for exposure” that’s bullshit too.  The college I attend currently gives students “real world” projects but they assign it as a class project for a grade.  So we have to do the work FOR FREE because we need the grade.  Then the client gets this awesome free work, and the school gets their logo on the project, and the students get nothing.

For example - last summer in the school’s Advanced Typography class, they got a “real world” project work on a Dragonboat race poster AND a brochure.  Two students were picked - one for each.  The student who worked on the poster put his logo on it, but it was removed by the school prior to printing.  The other student who worked on the brochure - who put in SHIT TONS OF HOURS - got her name and brief contact info on the back, but that was it. 

Do you know what this got the students?  NOTHING.

And this year - same class - they assigned the project again.  Now I am doing the work for a grade but will refuse to let them use it for a poster without pay.  And the brochure?  Well, they are keeping all the work that the other student did, but will remove her name and such on the back and change it to whoever changes the inside text.

So this “real world experience” for “exposure” is bullshit.  The client came back to the school because they know they can get free work.  No other clients contacted the students that did the work last year.

The "Oh Shit I'm Moving!" Giveaway!

war-d0gs:

Long story short, I’m moving from a house with a yard and a colony to an apartment which can have neither, and I have the capacity to only keep a few frozen VC things. However, my freezer is FULL of them, and I don’t have the time to clean them before the move, so I’m giving them…

Oh my god. 

OH MY GOD. 

NEW FRIEND.

I couldn’t handle myself as I watched our new friend meandering around and eating stuff.  I don’t know where she came from or where she lives, but she can hang out any time!

I’ve never really been able to see a groundhog up close like this, so it was pretty great.  I loved watching her eat with her little hands and nibble her salad. 

Damn, I love animals.

things-vet-taught-me:

sundrythings:

    The photo is of a syringe filled with euthanasia solution which is usually bright blue or neon pink in color to distinguish it from any other injectable medication. Euthanasia solution is just a barbiturate (usually pentobarbital) that is given in an excessive dosage. How does it work? Well basically it is GABA-ergic meaning it binds to GABA receptors in the CNS and potentiates their inhibitory action. Basically animals slowly go to sleep and then their brains and hearts “shut off”.
   I wanted to post this to clear up a few things about euthanasia. First of all, I am totally pro euthanasia. I think there are times when it is absolutely more humane to put an animal to sleep than to let it live in constant pain. People balk at putting animals down and applaud these no kill shelters but to me, it is worth putting down sick, old, poorly behaved animals that have little chance of being adopted and spend that money helping animals that have a better chance. That is an entire new thread in and of itself though.
   Being put to sleep does not hurt and animals don’t feel anything except the prick of the needle. I have had surgery before and imagine the sensation is much the same as being put under for that, you just slowly get more tired until you are asleep and don’t even realize it is happening. If an animal is particularly nervous we can give a sedative beforehand and this will help them calm down and relax. Some animals will take one last deep breath called an agonal breath and may tense their muscles, but they are not aware this is happening and it is just a reflex. We always warn owners that their pet may evacuate their bowls and bladders at the end and that their eyes will probably not be closed.
    If you are concerned about having a pet put to sleep, talk to your vet about it. They should have no problem discussing the entire procedure with you and telling you what to expect. As a veterinarian, we have to perform a few euthanasias a day and I think we tend to become a little numb about the entire thing. It would be far too difficult to become emotional at every one and we would suffer burn out very quickly. That being said, we still are attached to patients and a few vets I know have cried when they lose a patient they have known for years.  I always stick around after the procedure to offer hugs and to listen if needed.
    Vets do not enjoy putting animals down but at the same time we realize it is often for the best. Animals don’t understand “being alive” like we do. They cannot think “At least I am alive” and when they are sick they become stressed that they cannot move like they are supposed to or are in constant pain. Many owners want to keep animals that are unable to move on their own and can’t even defecate on their own alive with feeding tubes and catheters and I think that is the ultimate in cruelty and selfishness. It is an owner’s responsibility to know when it is time to humanely end a pet’s life and many people abuse this power.
   Before making rash decisions talk to your vet and decide what is best for your pet, not for you. Euthanasia is not a coward’s choice but that of someone very brave.

This is so important. I put my horse down about a year ago- I found him after he’d had a freak paddock accident and sustained injuries that were likely beyond repair, and his vitals were not good.
I took it one step at a time from the moment the vet arrived to treat him, to the moment he took his last agonal breath and passed away. I loved him with all my heart and soul, and I have never done something so hard in my entire life. I still cry about it and miss him every day, but I know that it was the right thing to do for him.
It’s always important to make the decision that’s best for your animal. Life will always end in death, and your animal has lived a longer life with you than it would have ever had without you. It will always be hard for you to say goodbye, but no harder than them suffering until their bodies can’t sustain it anymore.
The one thing that makes me smile from that memory was me getting up from sitting beside my horse, running after the vet as he went to leave, hugging him and saying thank you. Veterinarians have devoted their lives to protecting animal life, and it is never easy taking it away. I know that one day if a client did the same for me, it would bring me a lot of light in a dark situation xx

I’ve lost too many of my friends in the past two years alone, and it is never easy.  But euthanizing them was the only option for each of them.

My first dog, Skye, was about 12 years old.  She had an inoperable malignant tumor in her neck that was diagnosed when she was about 10 and continued to grow.  I had her on various medications to help as much as I could, but in the spring of 2013 she came to a point where she could barely sleep because she couldn’t breathe with the tumor pushing on her throat.  She must have been so exhausted.  My boyfriend and I cried a lot as we talked about the options, but the only way to help her was to put her down.  That was so hard, and I still get very upset when I think about her.
Just a few months after we lost Skye, my boyfriend’s oldest dog Cassidy (13) who had numerous medical problems since she was a pup became so disabled that she couldn’t get up on her own or do much of anything.  We think she might have had a brain tumor that caused what was probably geriatric vestibular disease, causing her to keep her head tilted and any time she tried to walk around she was tippy.  She also had seizures since she was a baby and originally they were told she wouldn’t live past a year old. 

Then just a few months ago we got a blow that one of our dogs, Xena, who was only six years old, came down with some auto-immune disorder where her body completely destroyed all of her red blood cells.  We gave her medication and even a blood transfusion, but two days later we had to put her down because her body was in critical condition.  She wasn’t getting any oxygen.
Every time our dogs were on their final days, we would camp out with them in the living room, on the floor, and all be as close as possible.
ANYONE who says that euthanasia is a bad choice, a coward’s choice, or anything of that nature, is selfish and stupid.  I would have loved to have my friends with me for many more years, but that wouldn’t have been the right thing for them.  There was nothing we could do to help them except to put them humanely to sleep. 

things-vet-taught-me:

sundrythings:

    The photo is of a syringe filled with euthanasia solution which is usually bright blue or neon pink in color to distinguish it from any other injectable medication. Euthanasia solution is just a barbiturate (usually pentobarbital) that is given in an excessive dosage. How does it work? Well basically it is GABA-ergic meaning it binds to GABA receptors in the CNS and potentiates their inhibitory action. Basically animals slowly go to sleep and then their brains and hearts “shut off”.

   I wanted to post this to clear up a few things about euthanasia. First of all, I am totally pro euthanasia. I think there are times when it is absolutely more humane to put an animal to sleep than to let it live in constant pain. People balk at putting animals down and applaud these no kill shelters but to me, it is worth putting down sick, old, poorly behaved animals that have little chance of being adopted and spend that money helping animals that have a better chance. That is an entire new thread in and of itself though.

   Being put to sleep does not hurt and animals don’t feel anything except the prick of the needle. I have had surgery before and imagine the sensation is much the same as being put under for that, you just slowly get more tired until you are asleep and don’t even realize it is happening. If an animal is particularly nervous we can give a sedative beforehand and this will help them calm down and relax. Some animals will take one last deep breath called an agonal breath and may tense their muscles, but they are not aware this is happening and it is just a reflex. We always warn owners that their pet may evacuate their bowls and bladders at the end and that their eyes will probably not be closed.

    If you are concerned about having a pet put to sleep, talk to your vet about it. They should have no problem discussing the entire procedure with you and telling you what to expect. As a veterinarian, we have to perform a few euthanasias a day and I think we tend to become a little numb about the entire thing. It would be far too difficult to become emotional at every one and we would suffer burn out very quickly. That being said, we still are attached to patients and a few vets I know have cried when they lose a patient they have known for years.  I always stick around after the procedure to offer hugs and to listen if needed.

    Vets do not enjoy putting animals down but at the same time we realize it is often for the best. Animals don’t understand “being alive” like we do. They cannot think “At least I am alive” and when they are sick they become stressed that they cannot move like they are supposed to or are in constant pain. Many owners want to keep animals that are unable to move on their own and can’t even defecate on their own alive with feeding tubes and catheters and I think that is the ultimate in cruelty and selfishness. It is an owner’s responsibility to know when it is time to humanely end a pet’s life and many people abuse this power.

   Before making rash decisions talk to your vet and decide what is best for your pet, not for you. Euthanasia is not a coward’s choice but that of someone very brave.

This is so important. I put my horse down about a year ago- I found him after he’d had a freak paddock accident and sustained injuries that were likely beyond repair, and his vitals were not good.

I took it one step at a time from the moment the vet arrived to treat him, to the moment he took his last agonal breath and passed away. I loved him with all my heart and soul, and I have never done something so hard in my entire life. I still cry about it and miss him every day, but I know that it was the right thing to do for him.

It’s always important to make the decision that’s best for your animal. Life will always end in death, and your animal has lived a longer life with you than it would have ever had without you. It will always be hard for you to say goodbye, but no harder than them suffering until their bodies can’t sustain it anymore.

The one thing that makes me smile from that memory was me getting up from sitting beside my horse, running after the vet as he went to leave, hugging him and saying thank you. Veterinarians have devoted their lives to protecting animal life, and it is never easy taking it away. I know that one day if a client did the same for me, it would bring me a lot of light in a dark situation xx

I’ve lost too many of my friends in the past two years alone, and it is never easy.  But euthanizing them was the only option for each of them.

My first dog, Skye, was about 12 years old.  She had an inoperable malignant tumor in her neck that was diagnosed when she was about 10 and continued to grow.  I had her on various medications to help as much as I could, but in the spring of 2013 she came to a point where she could barely sleep because she couldn’t breathe with the tumor pushing on her throat.  She must have been so exhausted.  My boyfriend and I cried a lot as we talked about the options, but the only way to help her was to put her down.  That was so hard, and I still get very upset when I think about her.

Just a few months after we lost Skye, my boyfriend’s oldest dog Cassidy (13) who had numerous medical problems since she was a pup became so disabled that she couldn’t get up on her own or do much of anything.  We think she might have had a brain tumor that caused what was probably geriatric vestibular disease, causing her to keep her head tilted and any time she tried to walk around she was tippy.  She also had seizures since she was a baby and originally they were told she wouldn’t live past a year old. 

Then just a few months ago we got a blow that one of our dogs, Xena, who was only six years old, came down with some auto-immune disorder where her body completely destroyed all of her red blood cells.  We gave her medication and even a blood transfusion, but two days later we had to put her down because her body was in critical condition.  She wasn’t getting any oxygen.

Every time our dogs were on their final days, we would camp out with them in the living room, on the floor, and all be as close as possible.

ANYONE who says that euthanasia is a bad choice, a coward’s choice, or anything of that nature, is selfish and stupid.  I would have loved to have my friends with me for many more years, but that wouldn’t have been the right thing for them.  There was nothing we could do to help them except to put them humanely to sleep.